Roma and Ostia Antica

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We arrived in Rome on Thursday after a spending about 11 hours in the air.  The flight overseas was great and Delta airlines is to be commended on their service.
We then connected to Rome via the Leonardo Express train.  We stayed at the Suore di Santa Elisabetta convent close to the city center. It is a very basic B&B, run by non English, but very pleasant nuns. Here is a view from the convent:

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After checking in, we took a walk around the Eternal City. Here are some of the sights we captured:

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Love this photo. A battle scarred Vespa parked next to an ancient Roman wall

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Colosseo

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My mom and a few friends used to call me Marcus Aurelio.

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Circo Massimo could seat 300,000 spectators for chariot races.

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A Roman luxury sedan

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Amazing sights around every corner!

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Later in the day we took an underground Rome tour with “Through Eternity Tours.” Pictured, our guide and archeologist Giovanni provides us with a tour briefing

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A bello tower

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Ancient fresco two levels below today’s Rome.

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Yes , that rounded triumph archway was constructed by Julius Caesar.

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Some of the streets were amazingly beautiful

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Speaking of beauty, here is Sandy at Ponte Fabricio on the Tiber.

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We ran across a protest of a planned tunnel construction between France and Italy.  It was pretty funny. Our tour passed right through the riot police line and neither the protesters or police seemed to care. Every time we visit, Roma has had a protest march. Italians like to speak out, you know.

Although rain was forecast for the entire week, day one was rain free and we stayed in hiking shape by walking for just under 10 miles.

Day two in Roma started out and remained rainy all day.  It really poured at times.  We packed up the rain gear and headed out to see Ostia Antica – the first colony of ancient Roma. Ostia was the original port city of Roma and was important for many reasons. It was responsible for the production of salt, which was used to preserve many foods and received goods from many foreign countries. A Roman fortress was also established to protect the city from invaders. Over time, the Tiber became silted up and eventually Ostia was abandoned. The city was itself covered in mud and preserved for centuries.

Here are some photos of this remarkable site:

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Romans were amazing city planners

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This place was an amazingly large colony.

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A grain mill business

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Sandy next to an ancient mill stone.

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Spectacular views

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The teatro could seat 4,000 residents!

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Surrounding the teatro and temple complex was the “Square of the Guilds” where 60 offices of local businessmen were located. The walkways were highlighted with mosaic advertising their wears in Latin and with sign language for those non Latin sailors. Here are a few examples:

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A wonderful interior wall mosaic in the museum

Sandy and I have been to Pompeii and now Ostia. Although Pompeii was amazing we both felt that Ostia was much more incredible. Plus, there was a nice museum on site and a great cafe and restaurant.

Day two in Roma concluded with a great meal at the restaurant Taverna featuring authentic roman cuisine followed by a romantic visit to the Fontana Trevi.

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Ciao Roma!

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5 Comments

Filed under Mark & Sandy's Camino 2014

5 responses to “Roma and Ostia Antica

  1. Lynda Eckard

    Hi Sandy & Mark! Looks like you’re off to a beautiful start. Love the pic of Sandy at Ponte Fabricio. Safe & Happy adventures to you. Can’t wait to see where you go next. Lynda

  2. Robin Fisher

    Beautiful and very informative. Looking forward to more blogs and pics!

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